Deliberate Practice and Stress

To summarize these results:

  • The average players are working just as many hours as the elite players (around 50 hours a week spent on music),
  • but they’re not dedicating these hours to the right type of work (spending almost 3 times less hours than the elites on crucial deliberate practice),
  • and furthermore, they spread this work haphazardly throughout the day. So even though they’re not doing more work than the elite players, they end up sleeping less and feeling more stressed. Not to mention that they remain worse at the violin.
  • Hard work is deliberate practice. It's not fun while you’re doing it, but you don't have to do too much of it in any one day (the elite players spent, on average, 3.5 hours per day engaged in deliberate practice, broken into two sessions). It also provides you measurable progress in a skill, which generates a strong sense of contentment and motivation. Therefore, although hard work is hard, it's not draining and it can fit nicely into a relaxed and enjoyable day.
  • Hard to do work, by contrast, is draining. It has you running around all day in a state of false busyness that leaves you, like the average players from the Berlin study, feeling tired and stressed. It also, as we just learned, has very little to do with real accomplishment.
  • what if being "calm" comes from being great at something, not the other way around like stated here?
  • what if there's no way to cut out the "busy work", in addition to trying to do "hard work"?
  • I feel like articles like that might be oversimplifying things
  • maybe connected to Great Thoughts that only can be thought with "hard work"?
Szymon Kaliski © 2020
mailtwittergithubwebring